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15 March 2014
positivebeatsthenegative:

cardiocutie:

Guys you don’t understand how awesome this is. This pattern happens everywhere. It happens on flowers and pinecones absolutely vegetables, it happens all around you. If you don’t think that’s like the realist shit ever i don’t understand you.It’s insane how the universe is literally full of beauty to the point that we can’t even see some of it. Beautiful down to the way it moves.

this is so cool

11:00 pm  89,804 notes

positivebeatsthenegative:

cardiocutie:

Guys you don’t understand how awesome this is. This pattern happens everywhere. It happens on flowers and pinecones absolutely vegetables, it happens all around you. If you don’t think that’s like the realist shit ever i don’t understand you.It’s insane how the universe is literally full of beauty to the point that we can’t even see some of it. Beautiful down to the way it moves.

this is so cool

(via buddha-has-a-boner)

15 March 2014
slavenewworld:

blacklightarene:

khaaaaaaan:

daunt:

hungrylikethewolfie:




1 can root beer, cold2 shots or more of Jack Daniel’s*1 big scoop of vanilla ice creamIn a mug, pour shots of JD whiskey.
Add in root beer and stir for 5 seconds.
Top with vanilla ice cream. Serve immediately.
*Adjust the amount of alcohol depending on how much of a hit you want to achieve.



Kara, I want you to know that this makes me think of you for reasons that I can’t quite determine.

I need this right now.

HNGGG

YES PLEASE

HOLY FUCK YES.

2:34 pm  60,076 notes

slavenewworld:

blacklightarene:

khaaaaaaan:

daunt:

hungrylikethewolfie:

1 can root beer, cold
2 shots or more of Jack Daniel’s*
1 big scoop of vanilla ice cream
  1. In a mug, pour shots of JD whiskey.
  2. Add in root beer and stir for 5 seconds.
  3. Top with vanilla ice cream. Serve immediately.

*Adjust the amount of alcohol depending on how much of a hit you want to achieve.

Kara, I want you to know that this makes me think of you for reasons that I can’t quite determine.

I need this right now.

HNGGG

YES PLEASE

HOLY FUCK YES.

(via themountainboy)

15 March 2014
in-utter-bliss:

ilovemysassysuperman:

itskalynbitch:

notanotherginger:

Those who say the Black Widow’s fighting style is just movie bullshit can see the above. ^ Shit is terrifyingly real. 

I think I’m in love.

She’s so tiny.
But she could kill me.
Great.


What

2:33 pm  685,965 notes

in-utter-bliss:

ilovemysassysuperman:

itskalynbitch:

notanotherginger:

Those who say the Black Widow’s fighting style is just movie bullshit can see the above. ^ Shit is terrifyingly real. 

I think I’m in love.

She’s so tiny.

But she could kill me.

Great.

What

(Source: zkarl, via charby)

15 March 2014

2:32 pm  21,584 notes

15 March 2014
Mindfulness starts with the body: somatosensory attention and top-down modulation of cortical alpha rhythms in mindfulness meditation

neuroticthought:

Here’s a nice review by Kerr et al. of the current research on mindfulness meditation, primarily focusing on the somatosensory cortex and top-down control.

Summary:

Using a common set of mindfulness exercises, mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) and mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) have been shown to reduce distress in chronic pain and decrease risk of depression relapse. These standardized mindfulness (ST-Mindfulness) practices predominantly require attending to breath and body sensations. Here, we offer a novel view of ST-Mindfulness’s somatic focus as a form of training for optimizing attentional modulation of 7–14 Hz alpha rhythms that play a key role in filtering inputs to primary sensory neocortex and organizing the flow of sensory information in the brain. In support of the framework, we describe our previous finding that ST-Mindfulness enhanced attentional regulation of alpha in primary somatosensory cortex (SI). The framework allows us to make several predictions. In chronic pain, we predict somatic attention in ST-Mindfulness “de-biases” alpha in SI, freeing up pain-focused attentional resources. In depression relapse, we predict ST-Mindfulness’s somatic attention competes with internally focused rumination, as internally focused cognitive processes (including working memory) rely on alpha filtering of sensory input. Our computational model predicts ST-Mindfulness enhances top-down modulation of alpha by facilitating precise alterations in timing and efficacy of SI thalamocortical inputs. We conclude by considering how the framework aligns with Buddhist teachings that mindfulness starts with “mindfulness of the body.” Translating this theory into neurophysiology, we hypothesize that with its somatic focus, mindfulness’ top-down alpha rhythm modulation in SI enhances gain control which, in turn, sensitizes practitioners to better detect and regulate when the mind wanders from its somatic focus. This enhanced regulation of somatic mind-wandering may be an important early stage of mindfulness training that leads to enhanced cognitive regulation and metacognition.

2:32 pm  239 notes

15 March 2014

2:32 pm  170,241 notes

yogabbagabbalou:

crazycatshipper:

chazzthejazz:

mama-bird:

bassmonstertiff:

imanithinks:

thagoodthings:

ghdos:

hamneggs116:

image

I’m still confused.

Same…

sooo…I just tested it…it works. wth.

i wonder if you practice this enough you can see the grids in your head

This is why japan is pretty far ahead of us in math and science, they have waaaay simpler methods of teaching arithmetic.

Do you have any fucking idea how much easier school would have been for countless kids with this one little hack??

Mind= Blown

(Source: theinturnetexplorer)

15 March 2014
psychology2010:

Sternberg’s Love Theory 
The triangular theory of love is a theory of love developed by psychologist Robert Sternberg. In the context of interpersonal relationships, ‘the three components of love, according to the triangular theory, are an intimacy component, a passion component, and a decision/commitment component’.Intimacy – Which encompasses feelings of attachment, closeness, connectedness, and bondedness.Passion – Which encompasses drives connected to both limerence and sexual attraction.Commitment – Which encompasses, in the short term, the decision to remain with another, and in the long term, the shared achievements and plans made with that other.

2:29 pm  63,554 notes

psychology2010:

Sternberg’s Love Theory 

The triangular theory of love is a theory of love developed by psychologist Robert Sternberg. In the context of interpersonal relationships, ‘the three components of love, according to the triangular theory, are an intimacy component, a passion component, and a decision/commitment component’.

Intimacy – Which encompasses feelings of attachment, closeness, connectedness, and bondedness.
Passion – Which encompasses drives connected to both limerence and sexual attraction.
Commitment – Which encompasses, in the short term, the decision to remain with another, and in the long term, the shared achievements and plans made with that other.

(Source: happy--l-ife, via coulerounager)

15 March 2014
neuromorphogenesis:


Mindfulness: Potent Medicine for Easing Physical Suffering
We’d like to be forever free from physical discomfort, but we’re in bodies and they get injured, sick, and old. The good news is that the Buddha prescribed some medicine—mindfulness—to help ease that physical discomfort. Mindfulness is not a miracle pill, but it is a miracle practice, meaning that, over time, we can learn to respond skillfully to the inevitable physical suffering that comes with being in bodies.
Bodily discomfort has three components:
The unpleasant physical sensation itself (pain, aching muscles, fatigue).
Our emotional reaction to that discomfort (anger, frustration, fear).
The thoughts that are triggered by the discomfort (the stress-filled stories we spin that have little basis in reality, such as, “This pain will never go away,” “I’ll never be happy again,” “I’ve ruined my partner’s life”).
Note that two of the three components that make up our experience of bodily discomfort are mental in origin! These two mental components are often referred to as “mental suffering.” They can make our physical suffering worse because mental reactions are felt in the body.





What is mindfulness?
Mindfulness is the practice of paying careful attention to what is happening in the present moment, whether it be a sight, a sound, a taste, a smell, a sensation in the body, or mental cognition (this latter includes emotions and thoughts). Mindfulness is called a practice because it takes practice: our minds tend to dwell in the past and the future.
You don’t need to be meditating to practice mindfulness. Right now, stop and take three or four conscious breaths, feeling the physical sensation of the breath as it comes in and goes out of your body. There. You’ve just practiced mindfulness!
Notice that while you were engaging in this conscious breathing, your mind wasn’t dwelling in the past or the future. You may have been aware of a sound, a smell, a bodily sensation other than the breath, an emotion, a thought. Meticulous attention to whatever is happening in the present moment is the essence of mindfulness. The sensation of the breath is often used as an anchor because breathing is always present in the moment.
How can mindfulness help ease physical suffering?
With practice, mindfulness calms and steadies the mind. This is beneficial because when we’re experiencing physical discomfort, our minds often churn with stressful emotions and thoughts, but they’re a muddy blur—we can’t sort them out. With mindfulness, the “mud” settles so we can see more clearly which allows us to identify what emotions and thoughts are present in our minds at the moment. “Ah, this is anger.” “This is fear.” “This is a worry-filled thought about the future.” With this clearer view, we can make skillful choices about how to respond to these emotions and thoughts—choices that will lessen our overall suffering.
Stressful emotions. Our habitual reaction to physical discomfort is some form of resistance and aversion, such as frustration or anger. By practicing mindfulness, we can counter that habitual response with one that’s more skillful.
Once we begin to treat ourselves with kindness, we can calmly and gently examine the actual physical sensation. It’s not a solid block of discomfort. We may feel waves of sensations, some of which may even be pleasant. We may notice some heat, some pulsating, some tingling. Using mindfulness to examine physical sensations reveals their ever-changing nature. This helps break up the sense that our whole being is only the discomfort.
Having noticed that the physical sensation keeps changing, we can reflect that our frustration is impermanent too. It arose but it will pass. This recognition alone weakens its grip on us.
Stressful thought patterns. At a meditation retreat in the 1990s, the Buddhist nun, Ayya Khema, told us, “Most thoughts are just rubbish, but we believe them anyway.” Becoming mindfully aware of the stories we spin about our physical discomfort quiets and steadies the mind so that the “mud” settles and we can see the thoughts more clearly. Then we have a choice. We can continue to blindly believe them or we can calmly assess their validity. Are you absolutely sure you’ll never be happy again or that you’ve ruined your partner’s life? 
Letting go of stress-filled stories that have little or no basis in fact is a tremendous relief. A smile might even appear on your face as you acknowledge the convoluted stories the mind can spin. As Buddhist teacher, Jack Kornfield, likes to say, “The mind has no shame.”
Mindfulness calms and steadies the mind so we can respond more skillfully to stressful emotions and thoughts. This, in turn, eases our physical suffering because we’re not adding mental suffering to it. As the wonderfully blunt Zen teacher, Joko Beck, said: “What makes life so frightening is that we let ourselves be carried away in the garbage of our whirling minds. We don’t have to do that.”
Mindfulness is the best medicine for not doing that.
For example, if we’re in pain, aversion in the form of frustration may arise. We have two choices. We can let that habitual response brew and get stronger; this not only increases our mental suffering, but it often increases our physical pain because the muscles surrounding the pain tighten in response to our frustration. Or, we can respond to our frustration by mindfully acknowledging it and beginning to incline our minds toward kindness and compassion for ourselves. (After all, who doesn’t get frustrated at times?) 

2:28 pm  527 notes

neuromorphogenesis:

Mindfulness: Potent Medicine for Easing Physical Suffering

We’d like to be forever free from physical discomfort, but we’re in bodies and they get injured, sick, and old. The good news is that the Buddha prescribed some medicine—mindfulness—to help ease that physical discomfort. Mindfulness is not a miracle pill, but it is a miracle practice, meaning that, over time, we can learn to respond skillfully to the inevitable physical suffering that comes with being in bodies.

Bodily discomfort has three components:

  1. The unpleasant physical sensation itself (pain, aching muscles, fatigue).
  2. Our emotional reaction to that discomfort (anger, frustration, fear).
  3. The thoughts that are triggered by the discomfort (the stress-filled stories we spin that have little basis in reality, such as, “This pain will never go away,” “I’ll never be happy again,” “I’ve ruined my partner’s life”).

Note that two of the three components that make up our experience of bodily discomfort are mental in origin! These two mental components are often referred to as “mental suffering.” They can make our physical suffering worse because mental reactions are felt in the body.

What is mindfulness?

Mindfulness is the practice of paying careful attention to what is happening in the present moment, whether it be a sight, a sound, a taste, a smell, a sensation in the body, or mental cognition (this latter includes emotions and thoughts). Mindfulness is called a practice because it takes practice: our minds tend to dwell in the past and the future.

You don’t need to be meditating to practice mindfulness. Right now, stop and take three or four conscious breaths, feeling the physical sensation of the breath as it comes in and goes out of your body. There. You’ve just practiced mindfulness!

Notice that while you were engaging in this conscious breathing, your mind wasn’t dwelling in the past or the future. You may have been aware of a sound, a smell, a bodily sensation other than the breath, an emotion, a thought. Meticulous attention to whatever is happening in the present moment is the essence of mindfulness. The sensation of the breath is often used as an anchor because breathing is always present in the moment.

How can mindfulness help ease physical suffering?

With practice, mindfulness calms and steadies the mind. This is beneficial because when we’re experiencing physical discomfort, our minds often churn with stressful emotions and thoughts, but they’re a muddy blur—we can’t sort them out. With mindfulness, the “mud” settles so we can see more clearly which allows us to identify what emotions and thoughts are present in our minds at the moment. “Ah, this is anger.” “This is fear.” “This is a worry-filled thought about the future.” With this clearer view, we can make skillful choices about how to respond to these emotions and thoughts—choices that will lessen our overall suffering.

Stressful emotions. Our habitual reaction to physical discomfort is some form of resistance and aversion, such as frustration or anger. By practicing mindfulness, we can counter that habitual response with one that’s more skillful.

Once we begin to treat ourselves with kindness, we can calmly and gently examine the actual physical sensation. It’s not a solid block of discomfort. We may feel waves of sensations, some of which may even be pleasant. We may notice some heat, some pulsating, some tingling. Using mindfulness to examine physical sensations reveals their ever-changing nature. This helps break up the sense that our whole being is only the discomfort.

Having noticed that the physical sensation keeps changing, we can reflect that our frustration is impermanent too. It arose but it will pass. This recognition alone weakens its grip on us.

Stressful thought patterns. At a meditation retreat in the 1990s, the Buddhist nun, Ayya Khema, told us, “Most thoughts are just rubbish, but we believe them anyway.” Becoming mindfully aware of the stories we spin about our physical discomfort quiets and steadies the mind so that the “mud” settles and we can see the thoughts more clearly. Then we have a choice. We can continue to blindly believe them or we can calmly assess their validity. Are you absolutely sure you’ll never be happy again or that you’ve ruined your partner’s life? 

Letting go of stress-filled stories that have little or no basis in fact is a tremendous relief. A smile might even appear on your face as you acknowledge the convoluted stories the mind can spin. As Buddhist teacher, Jack Kornfield, likes to say, “The mind has no shame.”

Mindfulness calms and steadies the mind so we can respond more skillfully to stressful emotions and thoughts. This, in turn, eases our physical suffering because we’re not adding mental suffering to it. As the wonderfully blunt Zen teacher, Joko Beck, said: “What makes life so frightening is that we let ourselves be carried away in the garbage of our whirling minds. We don’t have to do that.”

Mindfulness is the best medicine for not doing that.

For example, if we’re in pain, aversion in the form of frustration may arise. We have two choices. We can let that habitual response brew and get stronger; this not only increases our mental suffering, but it often increases our physical pain because the muscles surrounding the pain tighten in response to our frustration. Or, we can respond to our frustration by mindfully acknowledging it and beginning to incline our minds toward kindness and compassion for ourselves. (After all, who doesn’t get frustrated at times?) 

(via echoesofthetruth)

15 March 2014
darthbabe:

 

Grow Food, Not Lawns.In the UAE, so much water gets wasted to grow… well, grass. And yes, it looks pretty but that’s about it. Wouldn’t it be better to invest more in locally grown crops?

2:27 pm  7,229 notes

darthbabe:

 

Grow Food, Not Lawns.
In the UAE, so much water gets wasted to grow… well, grass. And yes, it looks pretty but that’s about it. Wouldn’t it be better to invest more in locally grown crops?

(via buddha-has-a-boner)

15 March 2014

2:24 pm  305,465 notes

txnk:

aros:

in Kakslauttanen, Lapland, Finland.

Hook me urrrp

(Source: tinyhouseswoon.com, via charby)

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